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Research Publications

Centre for Army Leadership

Mission Command on Operations Since 1991

CAL Mission Command And Leadership On Operations 2024 FINAL 1

Mission Command is the British Army’s Command philosophy, and equally a tenet of British Army leadership, both of which combine to underpin the Army’s ability to fulfil its core purpose – to protect the nation by being ready to fight and win wars on land.

In the British Army, Mission Command is founded on the principles of responsibility, unity of command, freedom of action, trust, mutual understanding, and the responsibility to act to achieve the superior commander’s intent. A decentralised system of command in which leaders grant followers freedom of action, with a reason why and within a clear intent, is fundamental to our ability to enact the Manoeuvrist Approach (ADP: Land Operations (2022)/AC 72202, Part 2). Employing these command and leadership principles in combination supercharges the conceptual component of fighting power and makes the Army the best it can be at delivering on its core purpose.

Read the Research Paper here

Risso, Linda (ed.), Mission Command and Leadership on Operations Since 1991 (Camberley: Centre for Army Leadership, 2024). AC 72278.  ISBN: 978-1-7394546-2-3. ©Crown Copyright

Leadership in International Organisations The Case for NATO

CAL Research Paper 01 23 Shea 1

International organisations are a crucial part of our daily lives although we often do not even realise it. They are essential in ensuring that our mail is delivered across the globe, trade runs smoothly, citizens can fly safely, international crime is tackled across borders, international health and safety standards are applied and so on. What we need as citizens are organisations that are well run, accountable, and with good governance. 

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Shea, Jamie, Leadership in International Organisations: The Case of NATO. CAL Research Paper 01.23. (Camberley: Centre for Army Leadership, 2023). ISBN: 978-1-7394546-1-6. ©Crown Copyright

Leading Through Crisis; A Practitioner’s Guide

Leading Through Crisis

The world is currently in crisis. Our health, economy, politics, industry, employment markets and indeed our social fabric are facing challenges unseen in our lifetime. It has created an environment characterised by fear, uncertainty, unpredictability, and across many sectors, an extraordinary pace of change. People are living and working under intense and sustained pressure. The world is uncharacteristically united in an effort to save both lives and livelihoods. Whilst this context is unprecedented,2 the characteristics of fear, ambiguity, prolonged pressure and exponential change are familiar to many in the Armed Forces
experienced in high-intensity operations. Whilst we do not pretend to have all the answers for the current environment, our foundations are built on operating in familiar ‘crisis’ situations. It is in this context that this paper offers a British Army perspective on Leading Through Crisis; A Practitioner’s Guide.

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Centre for Army Leadership, Leading Through Crisis: A Practitioners' Guide (Camberley: Centre for Army Leadership, 2020). ©Crown Copyright

Leading Through Crisis: Cross-Sector Lessons from COVID-19

Leading Through Crisis Cross Sector Lessons Electronic Sept 20 1

The Centre for Army Leadership asked a range of contributors to reflect on their leadership experiences. The result is this collection of papers: Leading Through Crisis: Cross-
Sector Lessons from COVID-19. While the British Army is proud of both its leaders and its leadership at all levels, we must never forget that the organisation does not have a monopoly on best practice.

Calibration of our thinking remains a critical task because we are secure in the belief that the day you stop learning is the day you stop being a leader.

Read the Research Paper Here

Centre for Army Leadership, Leading Through Crisis: Cross-Sector Lessons from COVID-19 (Camberley: Centre for Army Leadership, 2020). ©Crown Copyright

Army Leadership Doctrine

21 07 267 Army Leadership Doctrine Web 1

The purpose of the Army leadership doctrine is to codify the British Army's thinking on leadership, drawing together ideas, principles and methods that have been proven to work throughout history. It provides a focal point for British Army leadership and is designed to bring coherence and a shared understanding of leadership across all ranks of the Army.

As with all doctrines, the intention is not to restrict individuality or stifle imagination, but to help develop leaders, learn from the experience of others and adapt for the future.

It is not designed to be the sole source of information on leadership, but a solid foundation to encourage further study and discussion by Army leaders. 

Read the Doctrine here

Centre for Army Leadership, Army Leadership Doctrine (2021), AC 72029. ©Crown Copyright

A BRITISH ARMY FOLLOWERSHIP DOCTRINE NOTE

20230810 Followership Doctrine Note Final V11 1

The British Army exists to fight and win wars on land. War is a collective endeavour and success demands the best from our people, both as individuals and, more importantly, as high-performing teams. Effective teamwork underpins our philosophy of mission command. It requires leadership at all levels, inspiring and motivating others into action. It also requires values-driven, proactive, and professional followers, performing at their best to achieve the mission. All leaders are themselves followers and nearly all followers have the ability to lead. From Private to General, we all have a responsibility to follow.

Followership is the act of an individual or individuals willingly accepting the influence of others to achieve a shared outcome.

Read the Doctrine Note Here.

Centre for Army Leadership, A British Army Followership Doctrine Note (2023), AC 72029-1 ©Crown Copyright