Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment’s starring role in James Bond premiere

It was a case of ‘License to Drill’ for ten members of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment as they were on duty to line the famous red carpet at the world premiere screening of Daniel Craig’s last outing as 007 in the latest James Bond blockbuster ‘No Time to Die’ at London’s Royal Albert Hall.

It was well-deserved recognition for the role the regiment played during the scene in which one of the film’s stars, actress Lea Seydoux playing Madeleine Swann, runs past the Queen’s Guard, formed by the Life Guards Squadron of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment. It was a really early start on the day of filming, requiring the squadron to be on The Mall at 3 o’clock in the morning in order to practice the scene and then shoot a number of takes until it was perfect.

“It was an honour to be part of such a grand occasion and get international recognition not only for the part we played in the film and here on the red carpet, but also for what my regiment do on a daily basis mounting the Queen’s Guard and all the hard work that goes into that.” Guard Commander, Regimental Corporal Major C G (Dougie) Douglass

Speaking of his and his soldiers’ experience on the red carpet at the star-studded spectacular, Guard Commander, Regimental Corporal Major C G (Dougie) Douglass said: “It was an honour to be part of such a grand occasion and get international recognition not only for the part we played in the film and here on the red carpet, but also for what my regiment do on a daily basis, mounting the Queen’s Guard and all the hard work that goes into that.”  

They stood immaculately to attention, only their eyeballs occasionally twitching to glimpse which Royal or movie star was next to step onto the red carpet.

TRHs Prince Charles and William accompanied by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge joined stars of the film: Daniel Craig, Rami Malik, Lea Seydoux, Lashana Lynch, Ben Whishaw and Naomi Harris at the glittering spectacular.

Inside the Royal Albert Hall, healthcare workers rubbed shoulders with members of all three of the Armed Forces who had been invited to watch the film, which had seen its debut delayed by 18 months due to the COVID-19 global pandemic.