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Combat boots

Armed Forces personnel, Army, the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force, will receive a new range of brown combat boots to replace the black and desert combat footwear they currently wear.

Troops will have the choice of wearing five different boots, depending on where they are based and what job they are doing. The five types available are:

  • Desert Combat: worn by dismounted troops conducting high levels of activity in desert environments exceeding 40 °C
  • Desert Patrol: worn by mounted troops, typically drivers or armoured troops conducting lower levels of activity in desert environments exceeding 40 °C
  • Temperate combat: worn by dismounted troops for high levels of activity in temperate climates
  • Patrol: worn by mounted troops, typically drivers or armoured troops conducting lower levels of activity in temperate climates
  • Cold Wet Weather: worn by dismounted troops for high levels of activity in temperatures down to –20 °C

Each of the five boot types comes in two different styles, so personnel can wear whichever one is more comfortable for them.

Different foot shapes of men and women

The improved brown boots, which have been developed to match the Multi Terrain Pattern uniform worn by all service personnel, will be made in two different width fittings, taking into account for the first time the different foot shapes of men and women.

The new boots have been chosen after months of trials involving 2000 troops serving across the world in Kenya, Cyprus, Canada and the UK. The brown boots will be rolled out to personnel in all three services at the end of 2012. 

Black boots will continue to be worn with most non-camouflage uniforms and by units on parade in full dress uniform, such as Guards regiments on ceremonial duties in central London.

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